Quick custom blogs: Typo › WordPress

Having built a number of websites using WordPress as the core (backend), I assumed that WordPress was the easiest and quickest platform to work with. Surely, there was nothing that could be easier… Right?

Quire blog screenshot

I proved myself wrong while creating a custom Quire blog (powered by Typo) to match the recently re-launched public facing pages for MyQuire. My favorite part:

$ sudo gem install typo

Typo installed and configured from the command line. None of that a) manually create your MySQL database, 2) upload files, and 3) edit wp-config.php stuff.

Don’t get me wrong, Typo is not as “friendly” as WordPress, but it sure is easy to configure, customize, and deploy. ** This all assuming your RoR dev-environment is configured and running smoothly.

The first 5 to find me on MyQuire will net themselves one Mailplane invite each. What’s Mailplane? It’s a dedicated desktop client (for OS X) which integrates your Gmail or Google Mail accounts with the operating system giving it that “real desktop email client” feel. Make sure to drop me a message via MyQuire so I know where to send the invite.

Discuss - 9 Comments

  1. Sam Lu says:

    How does theme development compare to creating a theme for WordPress?

  2. Jason Reichl says:

    Already found you– sent an invite the first day the public site was open!

    I already have MailPlane. I just wanted to point out how good of a reader I am.

    :)

    Also, start posting more. I miss 5thirtyone

    -Jason

  3. beth says:

    This looks pretty cool, I’ll have to check it out. Installing WordPress doesn’t always have to be painful though, a lot of hosting providers come with a one click install. This doesn’t do much to help with installing it locally, but is nice none the less.

  4. James David says:

    Found you buddy. this could be interesting…

  5. Ben says:

    Found you, looking forward to Mail Plane (if you have invites left).

  6. Eric says:

    I found you on MyQuire, but I couldn’t find a way to send you a message. I tried a couple different things, but it didn’t work.

    Do you have to be friended first?

  7. Sounds cool, but like Sam said how is easy is it to custominze/make a theme? So will you be changing your engine?

    Darn to bad I’m not on a mac T.T

  8. Danny Trinh says:

    Respect for the promotion of Typo!

    @Sam Lu: It’s pretty straightforward. http://typogarden.com/ : there actually was a giant theming contest for Typo a while back. Hemingway from Warpspire found it’s roots in Typo.

    (PS, I couldn’t find a “message” link anywhere, so I just attempted to friend you)

  9. Derek says:

    How does theme development compare to creating a theme for WordPress?

    Theme development is a little easier with Typo. Mind you, WordPress offers far more as far as documentation & support is concerned for creating real non-blog "looking" sites. Typo is special in that there is a single master template which uses a handful of partials.

    Also, start posting more. I miss 5thirtyone

    I’m trying! Busy at the office. Make sure to check out the Quire blog as it seems I may be posting on that on a regular basis for work.

    I found you on MyQuire, but I couldn’t find a way to send you a message. I tried a couple different things, but it didn’t work.

    The application is going to receive a little makeover. MyQuire is interesting because you have two ways of sending a message to a user. 1) You can search by name to find a contact and message them directly from within MyQuire (after a friend request is sent and approved), or 2) send an email from you MyQuire account to a non-MyQuire users email address (this in turn would serve as an invite to join).

    Sounds cool, but like Sam said how is easy is it to custominze/make a theme? So will you be changing your engine?

    I’ve considered changing my blogging platform. Typo has a nice WordPress import which would make such a move much easier. The one thing that makes me really consider a move is how much less resource heavy Typo is. Everything is cached – by default. WordPress can be so darn resource hungry calling the MySQL database.